• 'Life without her would be death'

    The lost novel from the author of The Second Sex published in English for the first time.

    The compulsive story of two friends growing up and falling apart.

    INTRODUCED BY DEBORAH LEVY

    When Andree joins her school, Sylvie is immediately fascinated.

  • Real Estate

    Deborah Levy

    'Three bicycles. Seven ghosts. A crumbling apartment block on the hill. Fame. Tenderness. The statue of Peter Pan. Silk. Melancholy. The banana tree. A Pandemic. A love story.'

    From one of the great thinkers and writers of our time, comes the highly anticipated final instalment in Deborah Levy's critically acclaimed 'Living Autobiography'

    'I can't think of any writer aside from Virginia Woolf who writes better about what it is to be a woman' Observer on The Cost of Living

    Following the international critical acclaim of The Cost of Living, this final volume of Deborah Levy's 'Living Autobiography' is an exhilarating, thought-provoking and boldly intimate meditation on home and the spectres that haunt it.

    'I began to wonder what myself and all unwritten and unseen women would possess in their property portfolios at the end of their lives. Literally, her physical property and possessions, and then everything else she valued, though it might not be valued by society. What might she claim, own, discard and bequeath? Or is she the real estate, owned by patriarchy? In this sense, Real Estate is a tricky business. We rent it and buy it, sell and inherit it - but we must also knock it down.'

    'Real Estate is a book to dive into. Come on in, the water's lovely.' The Daily Telegraph

    'Her reflections on domesticity, freedom and romance are so beautiful, I found myself underlining multiple sentences a page. Wry, warm and uplifting, it's a book I'll return to again and again.' Stylist

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  • 'Unmissable. Like chancing upon an oasis, you want to drink it slowly... Subtle, unpredictable, surprising' Guardian

    Things I Don't Want to Know is the first in Deborah Levy's essential three-part 'Living Autobiography' on writing and womanhood.

    Taking George Orwell's famous essay, 'Why I Write', as a jumping-off point, Deborah Levy offers her own indispensable reflections of the writing life. With wit, clarity and calm brilliance, she considers how the writer must stake claim to that contested territory as a young woman and shape it to her need. Things I Don't Want to Know is a work of dazzling insight and deep psychological succour, from one of our most vital contemporary writers.

    'Superb sharpness and originality of imagination. An inspiring work of writing' Marina Warner

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  • A GUARDIAN BEST BOOK OF THE 21ST CENTURY

    The powerful second memoir from the twice-Man Booker Prize-shortlisted author of Hot Milk and Swimming Home

    'I just haven't stopped reading it . . . it talks so beautifully about being a woman' Billie Piper on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs

    'Life falls apart.
    We try to get a grip and hold it together.
    And then we realise we don't want to hold it together . . .'

    Praise for The Cost of Living:

    'It is the story of every woman throughout history who has expended her love and labour on making a home that turns out to serve the needs of everyone except herself. Wonderful. Not so much a memoir as an eloquent manifesto' Guardian

    'Wise, subtle and ironic, Levy's every sentence is a masterpiece of clarity and poise . . . a brilliant writer' Daily Telegraph

    'A graceful and lyrical rumination on the questions, "What is a woman for? What should a woman be?" ' Tatler

    'I can't think of any writer aside from Virginia Woolf who writes better about what it is to be a woman' Observer

    'Extraordinary and beautiful, suffused with wit and razor sharp insights' Financial Times

    'A heady, absorbing read' Evening Standard

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  • Hot Milk

    Deborah Levy

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2016
    SHORTLISTED FOR THE GOLDSMITHS PRIZE 2016

    Plunge into this hypnotic tale of female sexuality and power - from the Man Booker shortlisted author of Swimming Home and The Man Who Saw Everything

    'Propulsive, uncanny, dreamlike. A feverish coming-of-age novel' Daily Telegraph

    'A triumph of storytelling' Literary Review

    'Today I dropped my laptop on the concrete floor of a bar built on the beach. My laptop has all my life in it and knows more about me than anyone else. So what I am saying is that if it is broken, so am I . . .'

    'Perfectly crafted. So mesmerising that reading it is to be under a spell' Independent on Sunday

    'Hot Milk treads a sweaty, sun-drenched path into the history books. A properly great novel' Romola Garai

    'Hot Milk is an extraordinary novel, beautifully rich, vividly atmospheric and psychologically complex... Every man and woman should read it' Bernardine Evaristo

    'The contemporary writer I admire most' Linda Grant

    'Hypnotic... This novel has a transfixing gaze and a terrible sting that burns long after the final page is turned' Observer

    'Gorgeous. What makes the book so good is Levy's great imagination, the poetry of her language, her way of finding the wonder in the everyday. It's a pleasure' New York Times

    'Terrific, sizzling with heat and sexuality . . . You devour it in one sitting' Radio Times

    'Unmissable' New Statesman

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  • LONGLISTED FOR THE BOOKER PRIZE 2019

    SHORTLISTED FOR THE GOLDSMITHS PRIZE 2019

    'An ice-cold skewering of patriarchy, humanity and the darkness of the 20th century Europe' The Times

    'It's like this, Saul Adler.'

    'No, it's like this, Jennifer Moreau.'

    In 1988, Saul Adler is hit by a car on the Abbey Road. Apparently fine, he gets up and poses for a photograph taken by his girlfriend, Jennifer Moreau. He carries this photo with him to East Berlin: a fragment of the present, an anchor to the West. But in the GDR he finds himself troubled by time - stalked by the spectres of history, slipping in and out of a future that does not yet exist. Until, in 2016, Saul attempts to cross the Abbey Road again...

    'A time-bending, location-hopping tale of love, truth and the power of seeing. Thoroughly gripping' Sunday Telegraph

    'Writing so beautiful it stops the reader on the page' Independent

    'Levy splices time in artfully believable, mesmerizing strokes' Lambda Literary

    'Skewering totalitarianism - from the state, to the family, to the strictures of the male gaze - Levy explodes conventional narrative to explore the individual's place and culpability within history' Guardian

    'An utterly beguiling fever dream' Daily Telegraph

  • 2012 Man Booker Prize shortlisted. As he arrives with his family at the villa, Joe sees a body in the swimming pool. But the girl is alive. She is Kitty Finch: a self-proclaimed botanist with green-painted fingernails, walking naked into the heart of their holiday. Why is she there? And why does Joe's enigmatic wife allow her to remain?

  • Lapinski, a manipulative and magical Russian exile, summons forth a number of highly contemporary urban pilgrims. This book explores broken dreams and self-destructive desires in a shimmering, dislocated allegory of its times.

  • Black Vodka

    Deborah Levy

    How does love change us? How do we change ourselves for love - or for lack of it? Ten stories by acclaimed author Deborah Levy explore these delicate, impossible questions. From London gardens to a forest outside Prague, these are twenty-first century lives dissected with razor-sharp humour, about what it means to live and love, together and alone.

  • The Unloved

    Deborah Levy

    A group of hedonistic West European tourists gather to celebrate Christmas in a remote French chateau. Then an Englishwoman is brutally murdered, and the sad, eerie child Tatiana declares she knows who did it. The subsequent inquiry into the death proves to be more of an investigation into the nature of love, insatiable rage and sadistic desire.

  • Stardust Nation

    Deborah Levy

    Unforgettable, off-kilter graphic fiction from Booker-shortlisted novelist Deborah Levy

  • 'An exciting writer, sharp and shocking as the knives her characters wield' Sunday Times

    Like her namesake Jack Kerouac, J.K. is always on the road, travelling Europe with her typewriter in a pillowcase. From J.K.'s irreverent, ironic perspective, Levy charts a new, dizzying, end-of-the-century world of shifting boundaries and displaced peoples.

    'Levy is a brilliant writer' Telegraph

    'Levy's strength is her originality of thought and expression' Jeanette Winterson

  • Real Estate

    Deborah Levy

    'Three bicycles. Seven ghosts. A crumbling apartment block on the hill. Fame. Tenderness. The statue of Peter Pan. Silk. Melancholy. The banana tree. A Pandemic. A love story.'


    From one of the great thinkers and writers of our time, comes the highly anticipated final instalment in Deborah Levy's critically acclaimed 'Living Autobiography'


    'I can't think of any writer aside from Virginia Woolf who writes better about what it is to be a woman' Observer on The Cost of Living


    Following the international critical acclaim of The Cost of Living, this final volume of Deborah Levy's 'Living Autobiography' is an exhilarating, thought-provoking and boldly intimate meditation on home and the spectres that haunt it.

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    'I began to wonder what myself and all unwritten and unseen women would possess in their property portfolios at the end of their lives. Literally, her physical property and possessions, and then everything else she valued, though it might not be valued by society. What might she claim, own, discard and bequeath? Or is she the real estate, owned by patriarchy? In this sense, Real Estate is a tricky business. We rent it and buy it, sell and inherit it - but we must also knock it down.'


    'Wise, subtle and ironic, Levy's every sentence is a masterpiece of clarity and poise... A brilliant writer' Daily Telegraph on The Cost of Living


    'Extraordinary and beautiful, suffused with wit and razor-sharp insights' Financial Times on The Cost of Living

  • Swimming Pool

    • Objectif
    • 30 Novembre 2020

    'Swimming Pool' brings together for the first time the words of influential writer John Berger (1926-2017) and the drawings of his friend, the acclaimed British artist, Leon Kossoff.

  • These magnetic essays are nothing less than a reckoning, dissecting relations between the sexes, women and writing, work and life. Hardwick's provocative essays were first published in 1974 and won loyal admiration from writers including Joan Didion, Susan Sontag, Cynthia Ozick, Derek Walcott, and Joyce Carol Oates.

  • Here, 14 authors have been invited to work with key scientists to explore, through short fiction, various aspects of sleep research: from the possibilities of 'sleep engineering' and 'overnight therapies', to future-tech ways of harnessing sleep's problem-solving powers, to the challenges posed by our increasingly 24-hour lifestyles.

  • 'The great French feminist writer we need to remember' Guardian

    'Violette Leduc's novels are works of genius and also a bit peculiar' Deborah Levy, from the introduction

    An old woman lives alone in a tiny attic flat in Paris, counting out coffee beans every morning beneath the roar of the overhead metro. Starving, she spends her days walking around the city, each step a bid for recognition of her own existence. She rides crowded metro carriages to feel the warmth of other bodies, and watches the hot batter of pancakes drip from the hands of street-sellers.

    One morning she awakes with an urgent need to taste an orange; but when she rummages in the bins she finds instead a discarded fox fur scarf. The little fox fur becomes the key to her salvation, the friend who changes her lonely existence into a playful world of her own invention.

    The Lady and the Little Fox Fur is a stunning portrait of Paris, of the invisibility we all feel in a big city, and ultimately of the hope and triumph of a woman who reclaims her place in the world.

    'A moving, beautiful and authentic classic. We must be grateful to the Penguin European Writers series, a precious venture in these dark times, for bringing it back to us.' John Banville, Booker prize-winning author of The Sea

    'This book is as richly humane as anything else you're likely to read' Independent

  • Psychopathology, dedicated to the career of Professor Philip Holzman, surveys the matured study of mental disorder, with contributions from prominent scholars in the field. Coverage includes neuroanatomical, developmental, cognitive and genetic factors involved in schizophrenia and other psychoses.

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